SDPC Endowment Fund

Your Generous Donations Help Us Advance & Promote Psychoanalytic Thinking

Our strong ability to provide unique psychoanalytic training, mentoring, community education, and professional connections is made possible by the generosity of community donors to our growing Center's Foundation. Your tax-deductible contribution allows SDPC to continue providing fellowships, as well as expanded community outreach and public education programs. 

A separate fund within the organization’s assets, the SDPC Endowment Fund seeks donations in order to meet an initial target of $300,000. The fund manager will be guided by the intent to generate the best rate of return consistent with safety of the capital invested. The principal amount in the fund will remain invested unless the Board determines it is necessary to use it for operating expenses. The annual interest earned may be used for operating expenses if necessary to offset a budget deficit. The capital gain will remain in the fund unless the board determines it is necessary to use it for operating expenses. 

Endowment Fund Donors

  • $10,000 and above: Dan Yankelovich, PhD
  • $5,000 - $9,999: Bryan Bruns, MD;  John Hassler, MD; Barbara Rosen, PhD
  • $1,000 - $4,999: Dan Gardner, MD; Harry Polkinhorn, PhD, Tim Rayner, MD, Benoit Vincent, PhD
  • $500 - $999: Alain Cohen, Ph.D., Haig Koshkarian, M.D.
  • 0- $499: 

Profiles in Giving: Founding Donor Dan Yankelovich


 

In addition to Public Agenda, which he co-founded with Cyrus Vance in 1975, Daniel Yankelovich has recently founded the Yankelovich Center for Social Science Research at UCSD. The Center is designed to encourage social scientists to seek practical solutions to the nation’s most urgent problems.

He is the author, editor or co-author of thirteen books, the most recent being Wicked Problems, Workable Solutions. Others include Toward Wiser Public Judgment (with Will Friedman), Profit with Honor: The New Stage of Market Capitalism; The Magic of Dialogue; New Rules; Coming to Public Judgment, and Ego and Instinct (with William Barrett). 

His institutional affiliations have included: Founder and President of Yankelovich, Skelly and White; Founder and Chair of Viewpoint Learning, Inc.; Chairman, Educational Testing Service (ETS); Founding President, the Society for the Advancement of Socio-Economics; Founder, The New York Times/Yankelovich Poll; Trustee, Brown University; Trustee, The Kettering Foundation; Fellow, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences; Member, Council on Foreign Relations, and Director of a number of corporate boards, including CBS; USWEST; the Meredith Corporation; Loral Space and Communications; Diversified Energies and ARKLA. 

On the academic side, he has served as Research Professor of Psychology at New York University and the Graduate Faculty of the New School for Social Research. In 2009, he endowed the Yankelovich Chair in Social Thought at UCSD. 

He was named by PR Week as one of the ten most influential people of the past century in the arena of public affairs, communications and public relations. 

He is the recipient of the AAPOR Award for Exceptionally Distinguished Achievement, The Parlin Award for pioneering work in marketing research, the Dinerman Award of the World Association of Public Opinion Research, the Outstanding Achievement Award from the New York Chapter of the American Association of Public Opinion Research, and Distinguished Graduate of the Year Award from the Boston Latin School. 

He was educated at Harvard College, Harvard's Graduate School of Arts and Sciences and the Sorbonne.

I’m Dan Yankelovich, public opinion analyst, social scientist and an enthusiastic supporter of your center. I was first introduced to psychoanalytic thinking in graduate school. I was Rantoul Scholar in clinical psychology in Harvard’s department of social relations, a graduate program with a strong Freudian orientation. I remember being impressed by the power of the unconscious and the extent to which it shaped peoples’ thoughts and feelings.  I was fascinated by the distortions it created in people’s thinking. I pursued psychoanalytic theory further and in 1970 wrote a book with the philosopher William Barrett, entitled “Ego and Instinct” that was used a textbook in a number of psychoanalytic institutes.

My firm does annual tracking studies of how public opinion has evolved since the 1950s. They draw heavily on psychoanalytic thinking. It has helped me to understand how our society has made the transition from an uptight conformist culture in the 1950s with strict social norms to today’s more permissive moral culture.

Even though the impact of psychotherapy is difficult to measure, my own work and my personal experience with therapy has persuaded me that it has unique capabilities. It is often the most effective and practical way to help people cope with problems of living rooted in the unconscious.

Cognitive scientists like Daniel Kahneman have demonstrated experimentally that the conscious mind is subject to systematic distortions in ways that Freud anticipated more than a century ago. Centers like SDPC advance our knowledge of how the mind works and how to do a better job in managing life’s complexities. I encourage you to support the dedicated members of SDPC in their mission to keep psychoanalytic thinking vital in San Diego.